OK: Found an XML parser.
OK: Support for GZIP encoding.
OK: Support for character munging.

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Example Output

Channel: Culture – Movs.World

RSS URL:

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    array(11) {
      ["title"]=>
      string(51) "The “Emile Zola” collection.  “Pot-Bouille”"
      ["link"]=>
      string(65) "https://movs.world/culture/the-emile-zola-collection-pot-bouille/"
      ["dc"]=>
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        ["creator"]=>
        string(11) "Susan Hally"
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      string(31) "Thu, 09 Dec 2021 11:00:19 +0000"
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      string(36) "CulturecollectionEmilePotBouilleZola"
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      string(621) "“Pot-Bouille”, by Emile Zola, “Le Monde” collection, on sale at newsagents, € 10. A curtain rises, a facade disappears. By climbing the luxurious staircase of the Parisian building where he will settle, rue de Choiseul, Octave Mouret penetrates the hushed and secret world of the Parisian bourgeoisie. Led by the architect Achille Campardon, who will ... Read more"
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“Pot-Bouille”, by Emile Zola, “Le Monde” collection, on sale at newsagents, € 10.

A curtain rises, a facade disappears. By climbing the luxurious staircase of the Parisian building where he will settle, rue de Choiseul, Octave Mouret penetrates the hushed and secret world of the Parisian bourgeoisie. Led by the architect Achille Campardon, who will be its landlord, the Ladies’ Happiness clerk enters a hushed-up camera filled with intrigue, shameful loves, misery disguised in the theater of convenience. Here is the Paris of Baron Haussmann probed, explored and unveiled in the naturalistic verve of an archaeologist Emile Zola (1840-1902) of his time: « It was the dead peace of a bourgeois salon, carefully closed, where no breath from outside entered. Behind the beautiful gleaming mahogany doors there were like gulfs of honesty. »

Read also Emile Zola, humanism put to the test of humanity

To this volume of the Rougon-Macquart fresco, Zola gives the title Pot-Bouille, expression which designates a dish simmering on the fire, mixing in the “family grub” fresh food and leftovers of the day before. Zola cooks there mediocrities and hypocrisies that families hide, at all costs, behind their ceremonial walls. Because here, in the heart of the 2e arrondissement, under its appearance of liberal cathedral, the bourgeois hotel which enjoys water and gas on all floors also cultivates all the vices. Zola encamps a threesome there, as well as a pimp mother, a happy widow, a cursed abbot or even an ambitious young man, Octave, capable of all seductions to achieve his goal. If, within these walls, children of illegitimate unions are born, scandal never splashes them.

Read also Martine Le Blond-Zola: “Emile Zola was obsessed with the truth”

Like an echo to L’Assommoir, who depicted human poverty and weakness in the filth of huts, Zola here paints a “moral” portrait of the strata of society and their pretenses concentrated and hidden in Haussmannian architecture. Each floor has its own plot. From the ground floor and the mezzanine, devoted to traders, from the noble floor invested by notable owners, then from the upper floors welcoming a more modest bourgeoisie to the attics where the servants live, this urban population is one with its decor. Its conspicuous luxury is a mirror, a weapon and a rampart to always save appearances.

Published in 1882, Pot-Bouille dissects, x-rays and denounces silence, connivance and innuendo. Failing to share their virtue, masters and maids compete for a very relative moral sense. But even more, the novel underlines the artificial heredity of social castes, of which young girls are victims. Educated in respect for bourgeois and masculine traditions, unprepared for their own life, they are the stake of arranged marriages. Adultery will be the only outcome of a factitious freedom that the Church condemns but accompanies, more attached to saving appearances than souls. Like a play, between drama and vaudeville, a “household bath” with tragic accents, the building in rue de Choiseul is the witness and the vestige that set Second Empire society in stone.

You have 3.62% of this article to read. The rest is for subscribers only.

" } ["summary"]=> string(621) "“Pot-Bouille”, by Emile Zola, “Le Monde” collection, on sale at newsagents, € 10. A curtain rises, a facade disappears. By climbing the luxurious staircase of the Parisian building where he will settle, rue de Choiseul, Octave Mouret penetrates the hushed and secret world of the Parisian bourgeoisie. Led by the architect Achille Campardon, who will ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(4354) "

“Pot-Bouille”, by Emile Zola, “Le Monde” collection, on sale at newsagents, € 10.

A curtain rises, a facade disappears. By climbing the luxurious staircase of the Parisian building where he will settle, rue de Choiseul, Octave Mouret penetrates the hushed and secret world of the Parisian bourgeoisie. Led by the architect Achille Campardon, who will be its landlord, the Ladies’ Happiness clerk enters a hushed-up camera filled with intrigue, shameful loves, misery disguised in the theater of convenience. Here is the Paris of Baron Haussmann probed, explored and unveiled in the naturalistic verve of an archaeologist Emile Zola (1840-1902) of his time: « It was the dead peace of a bourgeois salon, carefully closed, where no breath from outside entered. Behind the beautiful gleaming mahogany doors there were like gulfs of honesty. »

Read also Emile Zola, humanism put to the test of humanity

To this volume of the Rougon-Macquart fresco, Zola gives the title Pot-Bouille, expression which designates a dish simmering on the fire, mixing in the “family grub” fresh food and leftovers of the day before. Zola cooks there mediocrities and hypocrisies that families hide, at all costs, behind their ceremonial walls. Because here, in the heart of the 2e arrondissement, under its appearance of liberal cathedral, the bourgeois hotel which enjoys water and gas on all floors also cultivates all the vices. Zola encamps a threesome there, as well as a pimp mother, a happy widow, a cursed abbot or even an ambitious young man, Octave, capable of all seductions to achieve his goal. If, within these walls, children of illegitimate unions are born, scandal never splashes them.

Read also Martine Le Blond-Zola: “Emile Zola was obsessed with the truth”

Like an echo to L’Assommoir, who depicted human poverty and weakness in the filth of huts, Zola here paints a “moral” portrait of the strata of society and their pretenses concentrated and hidden in Haussmannian architecture. Each floor has its own plot. From the ground floor and the mezzanine, devoted to traders, from the noble floor invested by notable owners, then from the upper floors welcoming a more modest bourgeoisie to the attics where the servants live, this urban population is one with its decor. Its conspicuous luxury is a mirror, a weapon and a rampart to always save appearances.

Published in 1882, Pot-Bouille dissects, x-rays and denounces silence, connivance and innuendo. Failing to share their virtue, masters and maids compete for a very relative moral sense. But even more, the novel underlines the artificial heredity of social castes, of which young girls are victims. Educated in respect for bourgeois and masculine traditions, unprepared for their own life, they are the stake of arranged marriages. Adultery will be the only outcome of a factitious freedom that the Church condemns but accompanies, more attached to saving appearances than souls. Like a play, between drama and vaudeville, a “household bath” with tragic accents, the building in rue de Choiseul is the witness and the vestige that set Second Empire society in stone.

You have 3.62% of this article to read. The rest is for subscribers only.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1639047619) } [1]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(74) "Kyriakos Kalaitzidis, a musician in search of the eastern memory of Greece" ["link"]=> string(101) "https://movs.world/culture/kyriakos-kalaitzidis-a-musician-in-search-of-the-eastern-memory-of-greece/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(11) "Susan Hally" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 09 Dec 2021 10:29:21 +0000" ["category"]=> string(59) "CultureEasternGreeceKalaitzidisKyriakosmemorymusiciansearch" ["guid"]=> string(101) "https://movs.world/culture/kyriakos-kalaitzidis-a-musician-in-search-of-the-eastern-memory-of-greece/" ["description"]=> string(717) "L’oudiste Kyriakos Kalaitzidis, in 2017. FOTEINI KALAITZIDOU The advantage of official celebrations, here the bicentenary of the independence of Greece supported by France, is to provide the opportunity for cultural programs off the beaten track. The Philharmonie de Paris thus takes over from the Louvre – which presents, until February 7, 2022, the exhibition “Paris-Athens. ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(3668) "

The advantage of official celebrations, here the bicentenary of the independence of Greece supported by France, is to provide the opportunity for cultural programs off the beaten track. The Philharmonie de Paris thus takes over from the Louvre – which presents, until February 7, 2022, the exhibition “Paris-Athens. Birth of modern Greece 1675-1919 ”- with a weekend of Hellenic music offering, far from the artificial sirtaki of Zorba, to discover all the richness of this living heritage, from Epirus to Asia Minor, from Thessaloniki to Crete.

“Each island has its own musical tradition, and fifty years ago the musicians of one village could not find a job in another, because the repertoire and the way of playing it were completely different”, recalls Kyriakos Kalaitzidis to illustrate this diversity. The large Pierre Boulez room and the evening of Saturday 11 December are reserved for this musician and researcher who embodies a free modernity anchored in tradition. With his ensemble En Chordais, the oudist has built a program around the theme of uprooting from his remarkable album Exil-Exile (Buda Musique / Socadisc, 2019), original compositions drawing on a wide variety of heritages.

The opportunity to distinguish the lyre of Constantinople from that of Pontos – in the absence of those of Crete, Dodecanese, Thrace and Macedonia -, to become familiar with the qanun (zither) or the toumperleki (drum). The iconic lute that is the bouzouki, however, is associated with more universal instruments, violin and piano, guitar, clarinet and viola da gamba. Among the fifteen participants, a woman who experienced exile in Paris, Maria Farantouri, for having been the voice of Mikis Theodorakis’ protest songs against the military dictatorship (1967-1974). The composer of the soundtrack of Zorba the Greek, died September 2, was deported to his own country as a communist.

“Family history”

« I grew up in a refugee family from Cappadocia [Turquie] from my mother’s side and from Pontos [rives de la mer Noire] on my fathers side, indique Kyriakos Kalaitzidis, 52 years old. My grandparents had the experience of exile, they had to leave their home and travel hundreds of kilometers to come and settle in Greece. [dans les transferts forcés de populations prévus par le traité de Lausanne de 1923]. I wanted to tell this family story with my music. As these situations are repeated today in the Mediterranean, I also wanted to reflect on the metaphysical damage of exile. – who are we ? What do we do ? Where are we going ? – and translate it into musical variations. “

You have 62.56% of this article to read. The rest is for subscribers only.

" } ["summary"]=> string(717) "L’oudiste Kyriakos Kalaitzidis, in 2017. FOTEINI KALAITZIDOU The advantage of official celebrations, here the bicentenary of the independence of Greece supported by France, is to provide the opportunity for cultural programs off the beaten track. The Philharmonie de Paris thus takes over from the Louvre – which presents, until February 7, 2022, the exhibition “Paris-Athens. ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(3668) "

The advantage of official celebrations, here the bicentenary of the independence of Greece supported by France, is to provide the opportunity for cultural programs off the beaten track. The Philharmonie de Paris thus takes over from the Louvre – which presents, until February 7, 2022, the exhibition “Paris-Athens. Birth of modern Greece 1675-1919 ”- with a weekend of Hellenic music offering, far from the artificial sirtaki of Zorba, to discover all the richness of this living heritage, from Epirus to Asia Minor, from Thessaloniki to Crete.

“Each island has its own musical tradition, and fifty years ago the musicians of one village could not find a job in another, because the repertoire and the way of playing it were completely different”, recalls Kyriakos Kalaitzidis to illustrate this diversity. The large Pierre Boulez room and the evening of Saturday 11 December are reserved for this musician and researcher who embodies a free modernity anchored in tradition. With his ensemble En Chordais, the oudist has built a program around the theme of uprooting from his remarkable album Exil-Exile (Buda Musique / Socadisc, 2019), original compositions drawing on a wide variety of heritages.

The opportunity to distinguish the lyre of Constantinople from that of Pontos – in the absence of those of Crete, Dodecanese, Thrace and Macedonia -, to become familiar with the qanun (zither) or the toumperleki (drum). The iconic lute that is the bouzouki, however, is associated with more universal instruments, violin and piano, guitar, clarinet and viola da gamba. Among the fifteen participants, a woman who experienced exile in Paris, Maria Farantouri, for having been the voice of Mikis Theodorakis’ protest songs against the military dictatorship (1967-1974). The composer of the soundtrack of Zorba the Greek, died September 2, was deported to his own country as a communist.

“Family history”

« I grew up in a refugee family from Cappadocia [Turquie] from my mother’s side and from Pontos [rives de la mer Noire] on my fathers side, indique Kyriakos Kalaitzidis, 52 years old. My grandparents had the experience of exile, they had to leave their home and travel hundreds of kilometers to come and settle in Greece. [dans les transferts forcés de populations prévus par le traité de Lausanne de 1923]. I wanted to tell this family story with my music. As these situations are repeated today in the Mediterranean, I also wanted to reflect on the metaphysical damage of exile. – who are we ? What do we do ? Where are we going ? – and translate it into musical variations. “

You have 62.56% of this article to read. The rest is for subscribers only.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1639045761) } [2]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(52) "In Kinshasa as in Brazzaville, the rumba in the skin" ["link"]=> string(79) "https://movs.world/culture/in-kinshasa-as-in-brazzaville-the-rumba-in-the-skin/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(11) "Susan Hally" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 09 Dec 2021 09:58:25 +0000" ["category"]=> string(35) "CultureBrazzavilleKinshasarumbaskin" ["guid"]=> string(79) "https://movs.world/culture/in-kinshasa-as-in-brazzaville-the-rumba-in-the-skin/" ["description"]=> string(615) "Musicians from the group Bana OK in concert in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo, in September 2021. HEREWARD HOLLAND / REUTERS The tempo starts slowly then accelerates, the step is swaying and the clothes elegant: the Congolese rumba makes “sapeurs” and “ambianceurs” dance in Brazzaville and Kinshasa, united by the love of this music. ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(7975) "

The tempo starts slowly then accelerates, the step is swaying and the clothes elegant: the Congolese rumba makes “sapeurs” and “ambianceurs” dance in Brazzaville and Kinshasa, united by the love of this music. The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (Unesco) will say in a few days, the week of December 13, if it is admitted, like the Cuban rumba five years ago, to the Cultural Heritage immaterial of humanity.

“It’s a moment that we look forward to. The rumba registered in the intangible heritage, it is absolute happiness, immortality ”, enthuses Jean-Claude Faignond, manager of the first bar-dancing in Brazzaville, Espace Faignond, in the district of Poto-Poto, where the Bantous orchestra of the capital was created in 1959.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers The pan-African rumba of singer Sam Mangwana

Kinshasa, for its part, has no doubts, to such an extent that the Council of Ministers welcomed this registration on November 26, “Outcome of a candidacy brought by the two Congos”, the Democratic Republic of Congo (whose capital is Kinshasa) and the Republic of Congo (whose capital is Brazzaville).

“Rumba is a passion shared by all Congolese It is sprawling, in all areas of national life ”, assures Professor André Yoka Lye, director in Kinshasa of the National Institute of the Arts (INA) and president of the “mixed commission for the promotion of Congolese rumba with a view to its inclusion in the heritage of humanity”. For him, this rumba is “A unifying element of social cohesion, but also of the past and the present”.

Jazz cousin

On both banks of the Congo River, its origins are located in the ancient Kongo kingdom, where a dance called I dig (a word which means “navel”) because it made man and woman dance “tight-tight”, navel against navel.

During the slave trade, Africans torn from their continent took with them an intangible baggage, their culture and their music. In America, they made the instruments they used at home. “Mainly percussion instruments, membranophones, idiophones and also our African piano, the xylophone”, explains to the DRC National Museum Gabriel Kele, head of the musicology department.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers Ray Lema: “In Kinshasa, we could not escape the rumba”

“The instruments have evolved”, he said; the style too, towards jazz in North America, rumba in South America. And this music came back to Africa, with the traders and the 78-rpm recorders.

In the musicologist’s office, a weathered instrument sits on a shelf. “This is Wendo’s first guitar”, says Mr. Kele proudly. Wendo Kolosoy (1925-2008), author in 1948 of the title Marie Louise, is one of the fathers of Kinshasa rumba.

Also read: Rumba, the soundtrack of changes in Congolese society

Rumba in its modern version is a hundred years old. It is a music of towns and bars, of meeting cultures and nostalgia, of “Resistance and resilience”, from “Sharing pleasure too”, with its lifestyle and dress codes (” leave on “), describes Prof. Yoka.

“Back to basics”

The texts, mainly in Lingala – the language most spoken in the two capitals -, most often sing love, he says, but they are to be heard in the second degree, because the messages are also critical and political. The monument in terms of political interpellation was, in 1960, Cha-cha independence, title of Joseph Kabasele (1930-1983), known as “Grand Kallé”, and of his African Jazz orchestra, which has become a kind of hymn of African independence.

Certainly, times have been less glorious, some artists have given in the « dithyrambe » of the power in place, which used rumba as a means of propaganda. “There were sometimes deviations”, recognizes Professor Yoka.

Read also Eight years in prison required against Congolese rumba star Koffi Olomide

The director of the INA also regrets a lack of “Professionalism” in the promotion, management and protection of intellectual property, which harms the « performance » Congolese music.

But, he assures, the rumba is very much alive and the pioneers have worthy heirs. Papa Wemba died in 2016, but “Koffi Olomide is rumba, Fally Ipupa is rumba Even those who are more restless, like Werrason and JB Mpiana, are nostalgic for a homecoming “. Roga-Roga’s talent is also appreciated on both shores. For the teacher, “The history of rumba is an eternal return”.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers Papa Wemba’s last rumba

On the floor of her restaurant in Kinshasa, Maman Beki, 65, in a long yellow dress with gold embroidery, is dancing. The steps are assured, the movement natural and effortless. Kinshasa’s famous nightlife is restricted these days by the anti-Covid curfew, set at 11 p.m., but every Friday and Saturday an orchestra livens up the evening. If Maman Beki’s husband, a great music lover, is no longer there, the tradition remains. ” I love to dance “, she said, adding to take this passion from her father, “Who won all the dance competitions” : “It’s in the blood »

The World with AFP

" } ["summary"]=> string(615) "Musicians from the group Bana OK in concert in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo, in September 2021. HEREWARD HOLLAND / REUTERS The tempo starts slowly then accelerates, the step is swaying and the clothes elegant: the Congolese rumba makes “sapeurs” and “ambianceurs” dance in Brazzaville and Kinshasa, united by the love of this music. ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(7975) "

The tempo starts slowly then accelerates, the step is swaying and the clothes elegant: the Congolese rumba makes “sapeurs” and “ambianceurs” dance in Brazzaville and Kinshasa, united by the love of this music. The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (Unesco) will say in a few days, the week of December 13, if it is admitted, like the Cuban rumba five years ago, to the Cultural Heritage immaterial of humanity.

“It’s a moment that we look forward to. The rumba registered in the intangible heritage, it is absolute happiness, immortality ”, enthuses Jean-Claude Faignond, manager of the first bar-dancing in Brazzaville, Espace Faignond, in the district of Poto-Poto, where the Bantous orchestra of the capital was created in 1959.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers The pan-African rumba of singer Sam Mangwana

Kinshasa, for its part, has no doubts, to such an extent that the Council of Ministers welcomed this registration on November 26, “Outcome of a candidacy brought by the two Congos”, the Democratic Republic of Congo (whose capital is Kinshasa) and the Republic of Congo (whose capital is Brazzaville).

“Rumba is a passion shared by all Congolese It is sprawling, in all areas of national life ”, assures Professor André Yoka Lye, director in Kinshasa of the National Institute of the Arts (INA) and president of the “mixed commission for the promotion of Congolese rumba with a view to its inclusion in the heritage of humanity”. For him, this rumba is “A unifying element of social cohesion, but also of the past and the present”.

Jazz cousin

On both banks of the Congo River, its origins are located in the ancient Kongo kingdom, where a dance called I dig (a word which means “navel”) because it made man and woman dance “tight-tight”, navel against navel.

During the slave trade, Africans torn from their continent took with them an intangible baggage, their culture and their music. In America, they made the instruments they used at home. “Mainly percussion instruments, membranophones, idiophones and also our African piano, the xylophone”, explains to the DRC National Museum Gabriel Kele, head of the musicology department.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers Ray Lema: “In Kinshasa, we could not escape the rumba”

“The instruments have evolved”, he said; the style too, towards jazz in North America, rumba in South America. And this music came back to Africa, with the traders and the 78-rpm recorders.

In the musicologist’s office, a weathered instrument sits on a shelf. “This is Wendo’s first guitar”, says Mr. Kele proudly. Wendo Kolosoy (1925-2008), author in 1948 of the title Marie Louise, is one of the fathers of Kinshasa rumba.

Also read: Rumba, the soundtrack of changes in Congolese society

Rumba in its modern version is a hundred years old. It is a music of towns and bars, of meeting cultures and nostalgia, of “Resistance and resilience”, from “Sharing pleasure too”, with its lifestyle and dress codes (” leave on “), describes Prof. Yoka.

“Back to basics”

The texts, mainly in Lingala – the language most spoken in the two capitals -, most often sing love, he says, but they are to be heard in the second degree, because the messages are also critical and political. The monument in terms of political interpellation was, in 1960, Cha-cha independence, title of Joseph Kabasele (1930-1983), known as “Grand Kallé”, and of his African Jazz orchestra, which has become a kind of hymn of African independence.

Certainly, times have been less glorious, some artists have given in the « dithyrambe » of the power in place, which used rumba as a means of propaganda. “There were sometimes deviations”, recognizes Professor Yoka.

Read also Eight years in prison required against Congolese rumba star Koffi Olomide

The director of the INA also regrets a lack of “Professionalism” in the promotion, management and protection of intellectual property, which harms the « performance » Congolese music.

But, he assures, the rumba is very much alive and the pioneers have worthy heirs. Papa Wemba died in 2016, but “Koffi Olomide is rumba, Fally Ipupa is rumba Even those who are more restless, like Werrason and JB Mpiana, are nostalgic for a homecoming “. Roga-Roga’s talent is also appreciated on both shores. For the teacher, “The history of rumba is an eternal return”.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers Papa Wemba’s last rumba

On the floor of her restaurant in Kinshasa, Maman Beki, 65, in a long yellow dress with gold embroidery, is dancing. The steps are assured, the movement natural and effortless. Kinshasa’s famous nightlife is restricted these days by the anti-Covid curfew, set at 11 p.m., but every Friday and Saturday an orchestra livens up the evening. If Maman Beki’s husband, a great music lover, is no longer there, the tradition remains. ” I love to dance “, she said, adding to take this passion from her father, “Who won all the dance competitions” : “It’s in the blood »

The World with AFP

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1639043905) } [3]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(27) "an old lady very surrounded" ["link"]=> string(55) "https://movs.world/culture/an-old-lady-very-surrounded/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(11) "Susan Hally" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 09 Dec 2021 00:09:21 +0000" ["category"]=> string(21) "CultureLadysurrounded" ["guid"]=> string(55) "https://movs.world/culture/an-old-lady-very-surrounded/" ["description"]=> string(552) "The Bayeux tapestry, an embroidery 68.4 meters in length, has survived the centuries. THE TAXI-BROUSSE COMPANY France 5 – Thursday December 9 at 8:55 p.m. – documentary She is an old lady who remains surrounded by mysteries. Almost a thousand years after its manufacture, the Bayeux tapestry continues to fascinate historians and scientists. Intended to ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(5524) "

France 5 – Thursday December 9 at 8:55 p.m. – documentary

She is an old lady who remains surrounded by mysteries. Almost a thousand years after its manufacture, the Bayeux tapestry continues to fascinate historians and scientists. Intended to celebrate the conquest of England by William of Normandy in 1066, the 68.4-meter-long embroidery has survived the centuries and miraculously survived wars and revolutions, fires and bad weather.

“No work of a comparable scope has come down to us, whatever the period of our history”, relates with reason the documentary that Alexis de Favitski and Jonas Rosales dedicate to the precious relic. By way of comparison, the hanging of the Lady with the Unicorn, another famous tapestry, kept at the Cluny museum, dates from the beginning of XVI.e century.

Despite its great age, the Bayeux tapestry – which is in fact an embroidery – is far from having revealed all its secrets. There is still no certainty about the identity of its sponsor and the place where it was made. It could be Odon de Conteville, the half-brother of William the Conqueror. Bishop of Bayeux and Earl of Kent, he appears many times on the nine canvases that support the embroidery.

Real picture book

The analysis of the fifty-eight scenes which compose it also suggests that it could have been embroidered in the English abbey of Canterbury, which is precisely in Kent. But difficult to say, because nobody knows where the tapestry was located during the first four hundred years of its life: the first proof of its existence dates only from 1476, in an inventory of the cathedral of Bayeux.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers The restoration of the Bayeux tapestry creates snags in Franco-British diplomacy

While waiting to resolve its last mysteries, the Bayeux tapestry is consulted by many academics, who come to draw material to confirm or deny their hypotheses on how Europeans lived in the XIe century.

A true picture book, the embroidery is full of details on the ships of the time (thirty-two are represented there), on the architecture of motte castles, the way of fighting with a lance and a sword ( the battle of Hastings, which was decisive in 1066 in the conquest of England by William, renamed “the Conqueror”, occupies a third of the work) or even the diet of the English and the Normans: roughly, the first favored beer, the latter pork and sea fish.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers The diplomatic loan of the Bayeux tapestry

We can only regret that the documentary, which does not avoid length, avoids certain subjects. Like these scenes representing naked women, pursued by men as the battle approaches, which could suggest rapes committed by the Norman army on the English population. Likewise, little or nothing is said about how William brought the island nobility to heel after his victory, confiscating almost all of the English land to give it to his followers and fiercely suppressing the various attempts at rebellion.

Specialists have, it is true, a mitigating circumstance: the tapestry ends abruptly after Hastings – William’s coronation is not even represented there -, which suggests that its last part has been destroyed or that it is not ‘has never been completed. Another mystery.

“The Mysteries of the Bayeux Tapestry”, documentary by Alexis de Favitski and Jonas Rosales (France, 2021, 90 min. Co-produced by La Compagnie des Taxi-Brousse) “Science large format” program, France 5.

" } ["summary"]=> string(552) "The Bayeux tapestry, an embroidery 68.4 meters in length, has survived the centuries. THE TAXI-BROUSSE COMPANY France 5 – Thursday December 9 at 8:55 p.m. – documentary She is an old lady who remains surrounded by mysteries. Almost a thousand years after its manufacture, the Bayeux tapestry continues to fascinate historians and scientists. Intended to ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(5524) "

France 5 – Thursday December 9 at 8:55 p.m. – documentary

She is an old lady who remains surrounded by mysteries. Almost a thousand years after its manufacture, the Bayeux tapestry continues to fascinate historians and scientists. Intended to celebrate the conquest of England by William of Normandy in 1066, the 68.4-meter-long embroidery has survived the centuries and miraculously survived wars and revolutions, fires and bad weather.

“No work of a comparable scope has come down to us, whatever the period of our history”, relates with reason the documentary that Alexis de Favitski and Jonas Rosales dedicate to the precious relic. By way of comparison, the hanging of the Lady with the Unicorn, another famous tapestry, kept at the Cluny museum, dates from the beginning of XVI.e century.

Despite its great age, the Bayeux tapestry – which is in fact an embroidery – is far from having revealed all its secrets. There is still no certainty about the identity of its sponsor and the place where it was made. It could be Odon de Conteville, the half-brother of William the Conqueror. Bishop of Bayeux and Earl of Kent, he appears many times on the nine canvases that support the embroidery.

Real picture book

The analysis of the fifty-eight scenes which compose it also suggests that it could have been embroidered in the English abbey of Canterbury, which is precisely in Kent. But difficult to say, because nobody knows where the tapestry was located during the first four hundred years of its life: the first proof of its existence dates only from 1476, in an inventory of the cathedral of Bayeux.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers The restoration of the Bayeux tapestry creates snags in Franco-British diplomacy

While waiting to resolve its last mysteries, the Bayeux tapestry is consulted by many academics, who come to draw material to confirm or deny their hypotheses on how Europeans lived in the XIe century.

A true picture book, the embroidery is full of details on the ships of the time (thirty-two are represented there), on the architecture of motte castles, the way of fighting with a lance and a sword ( the battle of Hastings, which was decisive in 1066 in the conquest of England by William, renamed “the Conqueror”, occupies a third of the work) or even the diet of the English and the Normans: roughly, the first favored beer, the latter pork and sea fish.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers The diplomatic loan of the Bayeux tapestry

We can only regret that the documentary, which does not avoid length, avoids certain subjects. Like these scenes representing naked women, pursued by men as the battle approaches, which could suggest rapes committed by the Norman army on the English population. Likewise, little or nothing is said about how William brought the island nobility to heel after his victory, confiscating almost all of the English land to give it to his followers and fiercely suppressing the various attempts at rebellion.

Specialists have, it is true, a mitigating circumstance: the tapestry ends abruptly after Hastings – William’s coronation is not even represented there -, which suggests that its last part has been destroyed or that it is not ‘has never been completed. Another mystery.

“The Mysteries of the Bayeux Tapestry”, documentary by Alexis de Favitski and Jonas Rosales (France, 2021, 90 min. Co-produced by La Compagnie des Taxi-Brousse) “Science large format” program, France 5.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1639008561) } [4]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(39) "when the voice of women is finally free" ["link"]=> string(67) "https://movs.world/culture/when-the-voice-of-women-is-finally-free/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(11) "Susan Hally" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Wed, 08 Dec 2021 18:59:24 +0000" ["category"]=> string(28) "Culturefinallyfreevoicewomen" ["guid"]=> string(67) "https://movs.world/culture/when-the-voice-of-women-is-finally-free/" ["description"]=> string(550) "These women tell about all the stages of this long road strewn with pitfalls, which are so many glimmers of hope for women today grappling with this scourge. PROGRAM33 / FRANCE TELEVISIONS FRANCE 2 – WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 8 AT 10.55 p.m. – DOCUMENTARY Hundreds of thousands of women are affected in France, but so far ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(4820) "

FRANCE 2 – WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 8 AT 10.55 p.m. – DOCUMENTARY

Hundreds of thousands of women are affected in France, but so far they hardly had a face. By agreeing to testify in front of Marie-Christine Gambart’s camera, Ariane, Isabelle, Michèle, Stacy and Sylvie are helping to lift the taboo around female alcoholism. Of different ages and backgrounds, these women, who could be our mothers, our sisters, our friends, our colleagues, tell, unvarnished and with great courage, their journey of addiction to alcohol. Precious stories to better understand what is a real disease, and its peculiarities in the female sex.

In the collective imagination, as one of them says at the start of the documentary, “A man who drinks is a good man. A woman who drinks is depraved. She is not a respectable woman and above all she is a bad mother ”. Ariane and the others began to drink in very different circumstances: festive context in the evening, family meals, withstand the shock of a violent spouse … And then the dependence that sets in, often insidiously, the disproportionate place gradually taken by drink in their life, to the point of obsession. “We think alcohol, we live alcohol”, sums up one of them.

All of them confide to what extent they have been able to lie to their family and professional circle (and sometimes to themselves), in order to give up and try to hide their addiction. Sometimes even hiding bottles in their baby’s pram!

Dramatic consequences

They do not hide anything either of the consequences, sometimes dramatic, of their excess of the “poison”: the family which denies them, the loss of their dash of life, their femininity, their dignity. In her office, the psychiatrist and addictologist Fatma Bouvet de la Maisonneuve, very committed to this subject, explains to her patients as well as to the spectators the problems of alcohol in women, which readily affect women who are rather perfectionists, in the avoidance of Conflicts. She also emphasizes the history of sexual assault and rape, “Which multiply by 36 the risk of falling into alcohol”.

On the long road strewn with pitfalls that is weaning, Ariane, Isabelle, Michèle, Stacy and Sylvie tell about all the stages, which are so many glimmers of hope for women today struggling with this scourge. It is by really giving a voice to women – let us also quote the recent documentary series “Des femmes qui drink”, on France Culture – that things will finally be able to change in this area.

On the set of “Infrarouge”, Marie Drucker will receive Nathalie Latour, general delegate of Federation Addiction, and Elsa Taschini, doctor in psychology, addictologist.

Female alcohol, documentary by Marie-Christine Gambart (Fr., 2021, 52 min.), program “Infrarouge”, France 2. To be reviewed (60 days) on france.tv

Women who drink, documentary series, France Culture, program by Perrine Kervran “LSD. The documentary series “

" } ["summary"]=> string(550) "These women tell about all the stages of this long road strewn with pitfalls, which are so many glimmers of hope for women today grappling with this scourge. PROGRAM33 / FRANCE TELEVISIONS FRANCE 2 – WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 8 AT 10.55 p.m. – DOCUMENTARY Hundreds of thousands of women are affected in France, but so far ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(4820) "

FRANCE 2 – WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 8 AT 10.55 p.m. – DOCUMENTARY

Hundreds of thousands of women are affected in France, but so far they hardly had a face. By agreeing to testify in front of Marie-Christine Gambart’s camera, Ariane, Isabelle, Michèle, Stacy and Sylvie are helping to lift the taboo around female alcoholism. Of different ages and backgrounds, these women, who could be our mothers, our sisters, our friends, our colleagues, tell, unvarnished and with great courage, their journey of addiction to alcohol. Precious stories to better understand what is a real disease, and its peculiarities in the female sex.

In the collective imagination, as one of them says at the start of the documentary, “A man who drinks is a good man. A woman who drinks is depraved. She is not a respectable woman and above all she is a bad mother ”. Ariane and the others began to drink in very different circumstances: festive context in the evening, family meals, withstand the shock of a violent spouse … And then the dependence that sets in, often insidiously, the disproportionate place gradually taken by drink in their life, to the point of obsession. “We think alcohol, we live alcohol”, sums up one of them.

All of them confide to what extent they have been able to lie to their family and professional circle (and sometimes to themselves), in order to give up and try to hide their addiction. Sometimes even hiding bottles in their baby’s pram!

Dramatic consequences

They do not hide anything either of the consequences, sometimes dramatic, of their excess of the “poison”: the family which denies them, the loss of their dash of life, their femininity, their dignity. In her office, the psychiatrist and addictologist Fatma Bouvet de la Maisonneuve, very committed to this subject, explains to her patients as well as to the spectators the problems of alcohol in women, which readily affect women who are rather perfectionists, in the avoidance of Conflicts. She also emphasizes the history of sexual assault and rape, “Which multiply by 36 the risk of falling into alcohol”.

On the long road strewn with pitfalls that is weaning, Ariane, Isabelle, Michèle, Stacy and Sylvie tell about all the stages, which are so many glimmers of hope for women today struggling with this scourge. It is by really giving a voice to women – let us also quote the recent documentary series “Des femmes qui drink”, on France Culture – that things will finally be able to change in this area.

On the set of “Infrarouge”, Marie Drucker will receive Nathalie Latour, general delegate of Federation Addiction, and Elsa Taschini, doctor in psychology, addictologist.

Female alcohol, documentary by Marie-Christine Gambart (Fr., 2021, 52 min.), program “Infrarouge”, France 2. To be reviewed (60 days) on france.tv

Women who drink, documentary series, France Culture, program by Perrine Kervran “LSD. The documentary series “

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1638989964) } [5]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(81) "The manuscript of the play “Germinal” by Zola bought 138,600 euros by the BNF" ["link"]=> string(102) "https://movs.world/culture/the-manuscript-of-the-play-germinal-by-zola-bought-138600-euros-by-the-bnf/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(11) "Susan Hally" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Wed, 08 Dec 2021 17:56:28 +0000" ["category"]=> string(47) "CultureBNFboughtEurosGerminalmanuscriptplayZola" ["guid"]=> string(102) "https://movs.world/culture/the-manuscript-of-the-play-germinal-by-zola-bought-138600-euros-by-the-bnf/" ["description"]=> string(747) "Emile Zola (1840-1902). DPA / PHOTONONSTOP The National Library of France (BNF) bought at auction, Wednesday, December 8, the manuscript of the play Germinal by Emile Zola, adaptation of the famous novel, announced the Minister of Culture, Roselyne Bachelot, on Twitter. This document – sold for 138,600 euros, says Sotheby’s – “Completes the exceptional collection ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(4366) "

The National Library of France (BNF) bought at auction, Wednesday, December 8, the manuscript of the play Germinal by Emile Zola, adaptation of the famous novel, announced the Minister of Culture, Roselyne Bachelot, on Twitter.

This document – sold for 138,600 euros, says Sotheby’s – “Completes the exceptional collection of the National Library of France devoted to the author and thus enters the national collections”, rejoiced the minister.

The highest bid, for this lot estimated at between 100,000 and 150,000 euros by Sotheby’s, was carried by the urban community of La Porte du Hainaut, in the North, told Agence France-Presse (AFP) the latter. This was without counting on the right of preemption which gives priority to the State, for the same amount.

” From now on, Germinal belongs to all “, underlined the president of this intercommunality, Aymeric Robin.

Read also Martine Le Blond-Zola: “Emile Zola was obsessed with the truth”

The first version of the censored play

The manuscript consists of 454 pages written between 1885 and 1887 by the hand of the famous naturalist novelist, to adapt his novel published in 1885.

“It joins the manuscript of the novel and more broadly all of the writer’s manuscripts, kept at the BNF, in order to shed new light on one of the most emblematic works of French literature”, welcomed the president of the BNF, Laurence Engel. Mme Engel hinted that she would take the initiative to show this manuscript: “I hope that the BNF will soon be able to present this work with strong symbolic significance in the region. “

This immensely successful account of a coal miners’ revolt in northern France in the 1860s had, according to Emile Zola, the potential for a theatrical adaptation that would reach an even wider audience. But the writer had the bad surprise to see the censors refuse the first version of his play, considered too subversive. He had to write a second, watered down, which failed.

Read also Emile Zola, humanism put to the test of humanity

According to Sotheby’s, the seller is a collector “European” who “Wishes to remain anonymous” and does not say “No more on the route” of “Last major manuscript of Emile Zola still in private hands”.

Communist elected officials from the North, MP Fabien Roussel and Mr. Robin, had called on the State to become a buyer so that the manuscript integrates public collections, in the same way as most of those of the author of the saga des Rougon-Macquart, a set of twenty novels.

The World with AFP

" } ["summary"]=> string(747) "Emile Zola (1840-1902). DPA / PHOTONONSTOP The National Library of France (BNF) bought at auction, Wednesday, December 8, the manuscript of the play Germinal by Emile Zola, adaptation of the famous novel, announced the Minister of Culture, Roselyne Bachelot, on Twitter. This document – sold for 138,600 euros, says Sotheby’s – “Completes the exceptional collection ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(4366) "

The National Library of France (BNF) bought at auction, Wednesday, December 8, the manuscript of the play Germinal by Emile Zola, adaptation of the famous novel, announced the Minister of Culture, Roselyne Bachelot, on Twitter.

This document – sold for 138,600 euros, says Sotheby’s – “Completes the exceptional collection of the National Library of France devoted to the author and thus enters the national collections”, rejoiced the minister.

The highest bid, for this lot estimated at between 100,000 and 150,000 euros by Sotheby’s, was carried by the urban community of La Porte du Hainaut, in the North, told Agence France-Presse (AFP) the latter. This was without counting on the right of preemption which gives priority to the State, for the same amount.

” From now on, Germinal belongs to all “, underlined the president of this intercommunality, Aymeric Robin.

Read also Martine Le Blond-Zola: “Emile Zola was obsessed with the truth”

The first version of the censored play

The manuscript consists of 454 pages written between 1885 and 1887 by the hand of the famous naturalist novelist, to adapt his novel published in 1885.

“It joins the manuscript of the novel and more broadly all of the writer’s manuscripts, kept at the BNF, in order to shed new light on one of the most emblematic works of French literature”, welcomed the president of the BNF, Laurence Engel. Mme Engel hinted that she would take the initiative to show this manuscript: “I hope that the BNF will soon be able to present this work with strong symbolic significance in the region. “

This immensely successful account of a coal miners’ revolt in northern France in the 1860s had, according to Emile Zola, the potential for a theatrical adaptation that would reach an even wider audience. But the writer had the bad surprise to see the censors refuse the first version of his play, considered too subversive. He had to write a second, watered down, which failed.

Read also Emile Zola, humanism put to the test of humanity

According to Sotheby’s, the seller is a collector “European” who “Wishes to remain anonymous” and does not say “No more on the route” of “Last major manuscript of Emile Zola still in private hands”.

Communist elected officials from the North, MP Fabien Roussel and Mr. Robin, had called on the State to become a buyer so that the manuscript integrates public collections, in the same way as most of those of the author of the saga des Rougon-Macquart, a set of twenty novels.

The World with AFP

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1638986188) } [6]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(43) "five questions to understand the phenomenon" ["link"]=> string(71) "https://movs.world/culture/five-questions-to-understand-the-phenomenon/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(11) "Susan Hally" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Wed, 08 Dec 2021 15:52:33 +0000" ["category"]=> string(36) "Culturephenomenonquestionsunderstand" ["guid"]=> string(71) "https://movs.world/culture/five-questions-to-understand-the-phenomenon/" ["description"]=> string(561) "A man walks past a poster of “One Piece” anime characters at Shibuya Station in Tokyo, ahead of the release of the 1000th episode on November 21, November 18, 2021. BEHROUZ MORE / AFP Two weeks after having known the thousandth episode of its television version, the hundredth volume of the manga One Piece arrives ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(11272) "

Two weeks after having known the thousandth episode of its television version, the hundredth volume of the manga One Piece arrives Wednesday December 8 in France. Its French publisher, Glénat, has announced a print run of 250,000 copies, including a very popular collector’s edition in brown imitation leather.

The opportunity to immerse yourself in this literary phenomenon which has sold more than 26 million albums in France. Alongside Son Goku (Dragon Ball), Naruto or Deku (My Hero Academia), Luffy, the hero of One Piece is one of the most popular manga characters.

What is “One Piece” about?

Published one chapter per week since 1997, the series chronicles the adventures of a teenage boy in a straw hat with a red grosgrain ribbon, Monkey D. Luffy, determined to become the greatest of pirates. In doing so, he seeks to get his hands on the “One Piece”, a famous treasure hidden by the mythical Gol D. Roger.

According to his adventures, Luffy will constitute a crew. One counts among his meetings Zoro, the swordsman with three sabers, Nami, the pirate thief and peerless navigator, Sanji, the very flirty dandy cook or Tony-Tony Chopper, anthropomorphic reindeer and doctor. To accomplish his purpose, Luffy can also rely on superpowers: by ingesting a Devil Fruit, he has become an elastic man. However, the fruit afflicts the sailor with a rather crippling curse: he loses the ability to swim.

One Piece was born from the imagination of Eiichiro Oda, a mangaka born in 1975 in Kumamoto, Japan. Big fan of drawing, from the series Vic le Viking, from rakugo (a form of traditional theater and only on a humorous scene) and especially comics, Oda will decide at a very young age to become a manga artist. High school student, he submits drawn stories to manga competitions organized by Japanese publishing houses to recruit young talents.

Awarded in 1992 and 1993, he caught the eye of the editorial staff of Weekly Shonen Jump – prestigious manga magazine and purveyor of successful series aimed at teenagers – the only publication by which he swears, he who is a fan of Dragon Ball.

After various unsuccessful proposals and internships with confirmed mangakas, the obstinate Eiichiro Oda will submit to his publisher a story of pirates, a theme however not very popular in the manga at the time. And thus realize his dream: One Piece starts to appear in the Weekly Shonen Jump in July 1997. It only took a few weeks to make his series one of the magazine’s most popular. Almost 25 years later, Eiichiro Oda is still in charge of what has meanwhile become the best-selling manga in the world, with more than 490 million volumes sold.

Read also From “Dragon Ball” to “One Piece”: “Weekly Shonen Jump” has become the manga’s hit machine

One Piece is also, since 1999, a television series which counts more than 1000 episodes. Broadcast every week, it is produced by the historic studios of Toei. There are also several films, video games and an upcoming serial adaptation with real actors on Netflix.

The crew, the “Straw Hat”, named after Luffy's famous headgear (center).

And One Piece is a manga said shonen, Originally intended for an adolescent and male audience, built around archetypal values ​​such as surpassing oneself, bravery or friendship, its readers are numerous and their profiles varied. Since its publication in France began in 2000, the series has sold over 26 million copies. The hearts of fans, now in their twenties or even thirties, discovered the children’s series when it was broadcast in the mid-2000s on TNT, at the end of the day. There are also their elders who, already fans of Japanese comics and animation since the programs “Récré A2” and “Club Dorothée”, continued to read manga or got back to it by discovering One Piece. A series that they then pass on to their children or share with those around them, when they are younger.

The current young generation is discovering it in turn, if we are to believe the sales figures in bookstores: in 2020, the first volume still sold more than 78,000 copies, according to its French publisher, Glénat. On ADN, one of the streaming platforms that broadcasts One Piece in France since 2018, the animated series has already accumulated 200 million views. The first week of its broadcast, each episode recorded 150,000 views. Many rappers, athletes, comedians and actors also claim to be fans of One Piece and sometimes allude to it in their profession.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers The manga “One Piece”, a French passion

Four volumes of One Piece, each grouping together several chapters, appear each year in France. The most frequent readers discover the series online, chapter by chapter. The Japanese publisher of One Piece, Shueisha has also been offering a French version of its free online reading app, Manga Plus, since September.

The animated series is broadcast almost simultaneously with Japan on Sunday morning, on streaming platforms such as DNA or Crunchyroll. The series is also broadcast on the Game One, J-One, Mangas or TFX channels.

Eiichiro Oda has never ceased to take his readers the wrong way and to distill riddles in his saga that he only solves years later, the better to keep them going. The very nature of the treasure which gives its name to its series remains, for example, still a mystery.

With each publication, One Piece appears at the top of the most popular discussions on networks

One Piece Therefore generates a lot of discussions, debates and, as the debut of the series coincides with the arrival of the Internet in homes, several sites and forums have, from the beginning, been devoted to it. Since then, with the development of the YouTube platform, many channels carefully analyze each chapter or episode. With each publication, One Piece appears at the top of the most popular discussions on social networks, including Twitter.

Readers of One Piece also salute the coherence of a very vast universe, with stopovers inspired by the landscapes of Spain, Egypt or the United States. “Oda has conceived his story as a sort of gigantic amusement park, with atmospheres and atmospheres specific to the regions in which we find ourselves”, explains Benoît Huot, manga editorial manager at Glénat.

In addition, Eiichiro Oda is committed to carving out his characters – heroes or enemies. Whether they are wacky or very serious, extras or members of Luffy’s crew, Oda endows them with a well-defined style but also with a past, a journey and dreams that they will try to achieve. “We work with an index of proper names, attack names, etc. which today must be 35 or 38 pages “, entrust Djamel Rabahi and Julien Favereau, the French translators of the manga.

One Piece is also known to be full of emotions, making you go from laughter to tears. Eiichiro Oda’s characters deliver their feelings and cry openly. Under an epic exterior, One Piece also addresses many themes such as slavery, xenophobia, corruption of leaders or ecology. The series also conveys many values ​​such as courage, fighting spirit and friendship.

If he did not give a precise deadline, Eiichiro Oda hinted that the plot of his manga was entering its last big part. A plausible hypothesis since the current sequence takes place in the Land of the Wa, a sort of feudal Japan inspired by prints and manga classics, while the mangaka had never placed his crew in his native country. A sort of conclusive and particularly epic home game where he has a lot of fun and places many cultural references, such as those evoking the rakugo that he loves.

But let fans be reassured: the series could last a few more years. Some are betting on an epilogue in 2027 for the 30 years of the saga.

" } ["summary"]=> string(561) "A man walks past a poster of “One Piece” anime characters at Shibuya Station in Tokyo, ahead of the release of the 1000th episode on November 21, November 18, 2021. BEHROUZ MORE / AFP Two weeks after having known the thousandth episode of its television version, the hundredth volume of the manga One Piece arrives ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(11272) "

Two weeks after having known the thousandth episode of its television version, the hundredth volume of the manga One Piece arrives Wednesday December 8 in France. Its French publisher, Glénat, has announced a print run of 250,000 copies, including a very popular collector’s edition in brown imitation leather.

The opportunity to immerse yourself in this literary phenomenon which has sold more than 26 million albums in France. Alongside Son Goku (Dragon Ball), Naruto or Deku (My Hero Academia), Luffy, the hero of One Piece is one of the most popular manga characters.

What is “One Piece” about?

Published one chapter per week since 1997, the series chronicles the adventures of a teenage boy in a straw hat with a red grosgrain ribbon, Monkey D. Luffy, determined to become the greatest of pirates. In doing so, he seeks to get his hands on the “One Piece”, a famous treasure hidden by the mythical Gol D. Roger.

According to his adventures, Luffy will constitute a crew. One counts among his meetings Zoro, the swordsman with three sabers, Nami, the pirate thief and peerless navigator, Sanji, the very flirty dandy cook or Tony-Tony Chopper, anthropomorphic reindeer and doctor. To accomplish his purpose, Luffy can also rely on superpowers: by ingesting a Devil Fruit, he has become an elastic man. However, the fruit afflicts the sailor with a rather crippling curse: he loses the ability to swim.

One Piece was born from the imagination of Eiichiro Oda, a mangaka born in 1975 in Kumamoto, Japan. Big fan of drawing, from the series Vic le Viking, from rakugo (a form of traditional theater and only on a humorous scene) and especially comics, Oda will decide at a very young age to become a manga artist. High school student, he submits drawn stories to manga competitions organized by Japanese publishing houses to recruit young talents.

Awarded in 1992 and 1993, he caught the eye of the editorial staff of Weekly Shonen Jump – prestigious manga magazine and purveyor of successful series aimed at teenagers – the only publication by which he swears, he who is a fan of Dragon Ball.

After various unsuccessful proposals and internships with confirmed mangakas, the obstinate Eiichiro Oda will submit to his publisher a story of pirates, a theme however not very popular in the manga at the time. And thus realize his dream: One Piece starts to appear in the Weekly Shonen Jump in July 1997. It only took a few weeks to make his series one of the magazine’s most popular. Almost 25 years later, Eiichiro Oda is still in charge of what has meanwhile become the best-selling manga in the world, with more than 490 million volumes sold.

Read also From “Dragon Ball” to “One Piece”: “Weekly Shonen Jump” has become the manga’s hit machine

One Piece is also, since 1999, a television series which counts more than 1000 episodes. Broadcast every week, it is produced by the historic studios of Toei. There are also several films, video games and an upcoming serial adaptation with real actors on Netflix.

The crew, the “Straw Hat”, named after Luffy's famous headgear (center).

And One Piece is a manga said shonen, Originally intended for an adolescent and male audience, built around archetypal values ​​such as surpassing oneself, bravery or friendship, its readers are numerous and their profiles varied. Since its publication in France began in 2000, the series has sold over 26 million copies. The hearts of fans, now in their twenties or even thirties, discovered the children’s series when it was broadcast in the mid-2000s on TNT, at the end of the day. There are also their elders who, already fans of Japanese comics and animation since the programs “Récré A2” and “Club Dorothée”, continued to read manga or got back to it by discovering One Piece. A series that they then pass on to their children or share with those around them, when they are younger.

The current young generation is discovering it in turn, if we are to believe the sales figures in bookstores: in 2020, the first volume still sold more than 78,000 copies, according to its French publisher, Glénat. On ADN, one of the streaming platforms that broadcasts One Piece in France since 2018, the animated series has already accumulated 200 million views. The first week of its broadcast, each episode recorded 150,000 views. Many rappers, athletes, comedians and actors also claim to be fans of One Piece and sometimes allude to it in their profession.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers The manga “One Piece”, a French passion

Four volumes of One Piece, each grouping together several chapters, appear each year in France. The most frequent readers discover the series online, chapter by chapter. The Japanese publisher of One Piece, Shueisha has also been offering a French version of its free online reading app, Manga Plus, since September.

The animated series is broadcast almost simultaneously with Japan on Sunday morning, on streaming platforms such as DNA or Crunchyroll. The series is also broadcast on the Game One, J-One, Mangas or TFX channels.

Eiichiro Oda has never ceased to take his readers the wrong way and to distill riddles in his saga that he only solves years later, the better to keep them going. The very nature of the treasure which gives its name to its series remains, for example, still a mystery.

With each publication, One Piece appears at the top of the most popular discussions on networks

One Piece Therefore generates a lot of discussions, debates and, as the debut of the series coincides with the arrival of the Internet in homes, several sites and forums have, from the beginning, been devoted to it. Since then, with the development of the YouTube platform, many channels carefully analyze each chapter or episode. With each publication, One Piece appears at the top of the most popular discussions on social networks, including Twitter.

Readers of One Piece also salute the coherence of a very vast universe, with stopovers inspired by the landscapes of Spain, Egypt or the United States. “Oda has conceived his story as a sort of gigantic amusement park, with atmospheres and atmospheres specific to the regions in which we find ourselves”, explains Benoît Huot, manga editorial manager at Glénat.

In addition, Eiichiro Oda is committed to carving out his characters – heroes or enemies. Whether they are wacky or very serious, extras or members of Luffy’s crew, Oda endows them with a well-defined style but also with a past, a journey and dreams that they will try to achieve. “We work with an index of proper names, attack names, etc. which today must be 35 or 38 pages “, entrust Djamel Rabahi and Julien Favereau, the French translators of the manga.

One Piece is also known to be full of emotions, making you go from laughter to tears. Eiichiro Oda’s characters deliver their feelings and cry openly. Under an epic exterior, One Piece also addresses many themes such as slavery, xenophobia, corruption of leaders or ecology. The series also conveys many values ​​such as courage, fighting spirit and friendship.

If he did not give a precise deadline, Eiichiro Oda hinted that the plot of his manga was entering its last big part. A plausible hypothesis since the current sequence takes place in the Land of the Wa, a sort of feudal Japan inspired by prints and manga classics, while the mangaka had never placed his crew in his native country. A sort of conclusive and particularly epic home game where he has a lot of fun and places many cultural references, such as those evoking the rakugo that he loves.

But let fans be reassured: the series could last a few more years. Some are betting on an epilogue in 2027 for the 30 years of the saga.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1638978753) } [7]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(75) "Nice book. “Kafka. The drawings ”: the work of a mischievous designer" ["link"]=> string(91) "https://movs.world/culture/nice-book-kafka-the-drawings-the-work-of-a-mischievous-designer/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(11) "Susan Hally" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Wed, 08 Dec 2021 15:21:21 +0000" ["category"]=> string(51) "CulturebookdesignerdrawingsKafkamischievousnicework" ["guid"]=> string(91) "https://movs.world/culture/nice-book-kafka-the-drawings-the-work-of-a-mischievous-designer/" ["description"]=> string(646) "A character from the hand of Franz Kafka. THE LITERARY ESTATE OF MAX BROD, NATIONAL LIBRARY OF ISRAEL / LES CAHIERS DESSINÉS “Kafka. The drawings ”, edited by Andreas Kilcher, translated from the German by Virginie Pironin and from the English Gaëlle Cogan, Les Cahiers dessinés, 368 p., 35 €. The work of Franz Kafka, ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(4494) "

“Kafka. The drawings ”, edited by Andreas Kilcher, translated from the German by Virginie Pironin and from the English Gaëlle Cogan, Les Cahiers dessinés, 368 p., 35 €.

The work of Franz Kafka, one of the literary monuments of the XXe century, is unique in that it never ceases to reveal little-known contours. As the centenary of the death of this secret writer (1883-1924) approaches, who only published a few hundred pages during his lifetime, here is just one part of this imagination, always modern and always fascinating, s ‘opens again to us with the recent discovery of more than a hundred drawings in a lively style, sometimes close to graffiti or scribbling, sometimes elaborate or realistic. To his often dark writing, they offer a note of humor and even cheerfulness. The superb album which brings them together for the first time proves this. It is enriched by contributions from Andreas Kilcher, a great connoisseur of Judeo-German literature, the visual artist Pavel Schmidt, who comments on each image, and a reflection by the American philosopher Judith Butler.

The dynamic line

The existence of these drawings was not in itself a secret. A handful of them had even already been published, notably in the 1930s, by the faithful Max Brod (1884-1968), friend and beneficiary of the author of Metamorphosis. Opposed to any global publication, Brod had sold four of them to the Albertina Museum in Vienna (Austria), in 1952. After his death, his heiress, Ilse Esther Hoffe, jealously kept them in his apartment on Spinoza Street in Tel Aviv. , requiring astronomical sums for their simple consultation. Subject, like the rest of Kafka’s literary succession, to the vagaries of a legal saga with twists and turns (well told in The Last Trial of Kafka, by Benjamin Balint, who reappears in his pocket at La Découverte, 288 p., 12 €), their exhumation was, for specialists, the only real surprise when the manuscripts arrived at the National Library of Israel in 2019 , coming from Zurich.

Read also Unpublished letters and drawings by Franz Kafka uploaded by the National Library of Israel

Surprisingly, relates Andreas Kilcher here, Max Brod had praised the merits of Kafka designer before learning that his friend, like him, was writing. Because the dynamic line specific to Kafka, which reduces the bodies to their gestures, was imposed by the originality of his style. One of his inspirations would come from the vogue of “Japonism”, which had won the Prague of the Belle Epoque. Minimalist, Kafka’s drawing crystallizes rather on the movement which results from an idea or a meditation, on the rapid or nervous sketch, less on the execution. Energy, more than the image, forms the main material. The bodies, always “In tension” and shown schematically, they are rarely seen with their extremities (face, feet); from realities they become signs, almost like letters. For Andreas Kilcher, the vocation of drawing at Kafka is neither simple illustration nor even representation, but adds “An aesthetic added value to the description”.

You have 29.13% of this article to read. The rest is for subscribers only.

" } ["summary"]=> string(646) "A character from the hand of Franz Kafka. THE LITERARY ESTATE OF MAX BROD, NATIONAL LIBRARY OF ISRAEL / LES CAHIERS DESSINÉS “Kafka. The drawings ”, edited by Andreas Kilcher, translated from the German by Virginie Pironin and from the English Gaëlle Cogan, Les Cahiers dessinés, 368 p., 35 €. The work of Franz Kafka, ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(4494) "

“Kafka. The drawings ”, edited by Andreas Kilcher, translated from the German by Virginie Pironin and from the English Gaëlle Cogan, Les Cahiers dessinés, 368 p., 35 €.

The work of Franz Kafka, one of the literary monuments of the XXe century, is unique in that it never ceases to reveal little-known contours. As the centenary of the death of this secret writer (1883-1924) approaches, who only published a few hundred pages during his lifetime, here is just one part of this imagination, always modern and always fascinating, s ‘opens again to us with the recent discovery of more than a hundred drawings in a lively style, sometimes close to graffiti or scribbling, sometimes elaborate or realistic. To his often dark writing, they offer a note of humor and even cheerfulness. The superb album which brings them together for the first time proves this. It is enriched by contributions from Andreas Kilcher, a great connoisseur of Judeo-German literature, the visual artist Pavel Schmidt, who comments on each image, and a reflection by the American philosopher Judith Butler.

The dynamic line

The existence of these drawings was not in itself a secret. A handful of them had even already been published, notably in the 1930s, by the faithful Max Brod (1884-1968), friend and beneficiary of the author of Metamorphosis. Opposed to any global publication, Brod had sold four of them to the Albertina Museum in Vienna (Austria), in 1952. After his death, his heiress, Ilse Esther Hoffe, jealously kept them in his apartment on Spinoza Street in Tel Aviv. , requiring astronomical sums for their simple consultation. Subject, like the rest of Kafka’s literary succession, to the vagaries of a legal saga with twists and turns (well told in The Last Trial of Kafka, by Benjamin Balint, who reappears in his pocket at La Découverte, 288 p., 12 €), their exhumation was, for specialists, the only real surprise when the manuscripts arrived at the National Library of Israel in 2019 , coming from Zurich.

Read also Unpublished letters and drawings by Franz Kafka uploaded by the National Library of Israel

Surprisingly, relates Andreas Kilcher here, Max Brod had praised the merits of Kafka designer before learning that his friend, like him, was writing. Because the dynamic line specific to Kafka, which reduces the bodies to their gestures, was imposed by the originality of his style. One of his inspirations would come from the vogue of “Japonism”, which had won the Prague of the Belle Epoque. Minimalist, Kafka’s drawing crystallizes rather on the movement which results from an idea or a meditation, on the rapid or nervous sketch, less on the execution. Energy, more than the image, forms the main material. The bodies, always “In tension” and shown schematically, they are rarely seen with their extremities (face, feet); from realities they become signs, almost like letters. For Andreas Kilcher, the vocation of drawing at Kafka is neither simple illustration nor even representation, but adds “An aesthetic added value to the description”.

You have 29.13% of this article to read. The rest is for subscribers only.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1638976881) } [8]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(59) "In Nice, the OVNi video festival expands and asserts itself" ["link"]=> string(86) "https://movs.world/culture/in-nice-the-ovni-video-festival-expands-and-asserts-itself/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(11) "Susan Hally" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Wed, 08 Dec 2021 14:19:21 +0000" ["category"]=> string(42) "CultureassertsexpandsFestivalniceOVNivideo" ["guid"]=> string(86) "https://movs.world/culture/in-nice-the-ovni-video-festival-expands-and-asserts-itself/" ["description"]=> string(629) "“Everything must disappear”, installation-performance by Clara Thomine in Nice as part of the 2021 OVNi video festival. The seventh edition of the OVNi video art festival in Nice has just ended. The acronym means “Nice video objective”, but could apply to the event itself, as it is outside the norm: spread throughout the city and ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(4161) "

The seventh edition of the OVNi video art festival in Nice has just ended. The acronym means “Nice video objective”, but could apply to the event itself, as it is outside the norm: spread throughout the city and even beyond, since this year the National Museum of Monaco participated. – with a look at its last ten years of acquisitions which turn out to be surprisingly sharp -, its origin is not a museum, nor a gallery, nor an art center – even if some participate -, but a hotelier.

Odile Redolfi owns the Windsor in the city center. An atypical place, which has voluntarily given up on becoming a luxury establishment, preferring to entrust the decoration of its rooms to contemporary artists, each one more crazy than the next, which may delight some customers and scare away the majority of others.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers Video art, a pleasing UFO in Nice

Noting that the off-season, around the month of November, deserves its name, she had the idea of ​​convincing some of her colleagues to take the opportunity to invite artists, thus creating this festival which has been rising every year since. in power. Galleries, art centers and museums are associated with it, collectors, good fairies, have leaned over the cradle and the result is striking.

Also read: Article reserved for our subscribers In Nice, a UFO to monitor the video

Thus, it was one of the rare events not to be invisible in 2020, when, due to the pandemic, the closed places were more so than usual. At the initiative of Pia Maria Martin, professor at the Villa Arson, the videos that could not be seen in the rooms were projected on the windows, to the great joy or the greatest fright of passers-by.

ORLAN as guest of honor

The 2021 edition differs from the previous ones: they could take on an art fair aspect since galleries were invited to present their foals. This is no longer the case. A hotel, the West End, welcomes young people – under 35 – videographers from the region, one of whom, Juliette Guérin, is relocated to the fitness room of the Splendid hotel with a particularly gory and delightful film.

The hotel La Malmaison also welcomes a young artist, Agathe Wiesner, but above all works on loan from major museums: Petra Noordkamp’s video is in the Guggenheim’s collection, that of Hyewon Kwon comes from the Korean museum SongEun Art Space, that of ‘Elisa Giardina Papa from the Australian UQ Art Museum and that of Barbara Visser from the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam. Coming from Villa Arson, Clémentine Remy is the regional of the stage.

You have 39.67% of this article left to read. The rest is for subscribers only.

" } ["summary"]=> string(629) "“Everything must disappear”, installation-performance by Clara Thomine in Nice as part of the 2021 OVNi video festival. The seventh edition of the OVNi video art festival in Nice has just ended. The acronym means “Nice video objective”, but could apply to the event itself, as it is outside the norm: spread throughout the city and ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(4161) "

The seventh edition of the OVNi video art festival in Nice has just ended. The acronym means “Nice video objective”, but could apply to the event itself, as it is outside the norm: spread throughout the city and even beyond, since this year the National Museum of Monaco participated. – with a look at its last ten years of acquisitions which turn out to be surprisingly sharp -, its origin is not a museum, nor a gallery, nor an art center – even if some participate -, but a hotelier.

Odile Redolfi owns the Windsor in the city center. An atypical place, which has voluntarily given up on becoming a luxury establishment, preferring to entrust the decoration of its rooms to contemporary artists, each one more crazy than the next, which may delight some customers and scare away the majority of others.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers Video art, a pleasing UFO in Nice

Noting that the off-season, around the month of November, deserves its name, she had the idea of ​​convincing some of her colleagues to take the opportunity to invite artists, thus creating this festival which has been rising every year since. in power. Galleries, art centers and museums are associated with it, collectors, good fairies, have leaned over the cradle and the result is striking.

Also read: Article reserved for our subscribers In Nice, a UFO to monitor the video

Thus, it was one of the rare events not to be invisible in 2020, when, due to the pandemic, the closed places were more so than usual. At the initiative of Pia Maria Martin, professor at the Villa Arson, the videos that could not be seen in the rooms were projected on the windows, to the great joy or the greatest fright of passers-by.

ORLAN as guest of honor

The 2021 edition differs from the previous ones: they could take on an art fair aspect since galleries were invited to present their foals. This is no longer the case. A hotel, the West End, welcomes young people – under 35 – videographers from the region, one of whom, Juliette Guérin, is relocated to the fitness room of the Splendid hotel with a particularly gory and delightful film.

The hotel La Malmaison also welcomes a young artist, Agathe Wiesner, but above all works on loan from major museums: Petra Noordkamp’s video is in the Guggenheim’s collection, that of Hyewon Kwon comes from the Korean museum SongEun Art Space, that of ‘Elisa Giardina Papa from the Australian UQ Art Museum and that of Barbara Visser from the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam. Coming from Villa Arson, Clémentine Remy is the regional of the stage.

You have 39.67% of this article left to read. The rest is for subscribers only.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1638973161) } [9]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(69) "Jean-Marie Rossi, dean of the great Parisian antique dealers, is dead" ["link"]=> string(95) "https://movs.world/culture/jean-marie-rossi-dean-of-the-great-parisian-antique-dealers-is-dead/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(11) "Susan Hally" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Wed, 08 Dec 2021 13:48:19 +0000" ["category"]=> string(56) "CultureantiquedeaddealersDeangreatJeanMarieParisianRossi" ["guid"]=> string(95) "https://movs.world/culture/jean-marie-rossi-dean-of-the-great-parisian-antique-dealers-is-dead/" ["description"]=> string(662) "Jean-Marie Rossi and his wife, in February 2011, during a gala at the Théâtre Montparnasse in Paris. RINDOFF-GUIREC / BESTIMAGE Jean-Marie Rossi was the last of the Mohicans, the dean of the great antique dealers specializing in 18th century furniture.e and XIXe centuries. His very tall height and his sometimes cowardly humor impressed visitors to ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(4268) "

Jean-Marie Rossi was the last of the Mohicans, the dean of the great antique dealers specializing in 18th century furniture.e and XIXe centuries. His very tall height and his sometimes cowardly humor impressed visitors to his gallery in Place Beauvau (8e arrondissement of Paris), where he took up residence in 1999, a stone’s throw from the Elysée Palace. In half a century of activity, this atypical eye had known the crème de la crème of collectors and decorators as well as the ups and downs of the antiques market. The merchant died on December 5, at the age of 91, in Rueil-Malmaison (Hauts-de-Seine).

Born on November 18, 1930 from a Milanese worker father, CGT and anticlerical delegate, and an Alsatian mother, the young Jean-Marie joined in 1956 the antiquarian Maurice Aveline, rue du Cirque, of whom he quickly became the right-hand man, then the partner. Very quickly, too, luck smiled on him. His first major business was a five-meter-long sideboard – a long low sideboard – from the cabinetmaker BVRB, bought for 260 pounds at a sale in London, and resold for 17 million dollars.

He prefers the eighteenth century to furniture that can be used anywhere.e “extraordinary and unreasonable” century, “the castle atmosphere, the invitation to party”

In the years 1970-1980, the furniture market of the XVIIIe at his best. His clients are John Paul Getty, Agnelli, Gunther Sachs and Hubert de Givenchy. If he stands out as a tenor of his profession, alongside Didier Aaron, Bernard Steinitz, Jacques Perrin and Maurice Ségoura, Jean-Marie Rossi does not fit the mold. He prefers the eighteenth century to furniture that can be used anywhere.e century “Extraordinary and unreasonable”, “The castle atmosphere, the invitation to the party”, he will say in the book Being an antique dealer (ed. Conflict !, 1983). When his colleagues were interested exclusively in statutory furniture, Riesener-stamped desks or Boulle cabinets, Jean-Marie Rossi pushed his curiosity towards English, Italian or German furniture as well as towards the 19th century.e century, then denigrated. “The Rossi taste was the originality of the shapes, summarizes the dealer Bill Pallot. He was interested in unusual objects, which anticipated their time. “

“A sacred panache”

Antique dealer by day, he spends his evenings in the company of artists, César, Arman and Etienne-Martin. In 1960, he even attended the famous performance during which Yves Klein, in a bow tie, orchestrated an anthropometry at the International Gallery of Contemporary Art. The daring antique dealer will be one of the very first French buyers of pop art. To his credit also works by Daniel Buren and Sol LeWitt. His best deal? A painting by Roy Lichtenstein, acquired for 6,000 francs at the Ileana Sonnabend gallery, the resale of which, years later, enabled him to purchase the walls of his 700 m2 gallery.2 place Beauvau.

You have 43.7% of this article to read. The rest is for subscribers only.

" } ["summary"]=> string(662) "Jean-Marie Rossi and his wife, in February 2011, during a gala at the Théâtre Montparnasse in Paris. RINDOFF-GUIREC / BESTIMAGE Jean-Marie Rossi was the last of the Mohicans, the dean of the great antique dealers specializing in 18th century furniture.e and XIXe centuries. His very tall height and his sometimes cowardly humor impressed visitors to ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(4268) "

Jean-Marie Rossi was the last of the Mohicans, the dean of the great antique dealers specializing in 18th century furniture.e and XIXe centuries. His very tall height and his sometimes cowardly humor impressed visitors to his gallery in Place Beauvau (8e arrondissement of Paris), where he took up residence in 1999, a stone’s throw from the Elysée Palace. In half a century of activity, this atypical eye had known the crème de la crème of collectors and decorators as well as the ups and downs of the antiques market. The merchant died on December 5, at the age of 91, in Rueil-Malmaison (Hauts-de-Seine).

Born on November 18, 1930 from a Milanese worker father, CGT and anticlerical delegate, and an Alsatian mother, the young Jean-Marie joined in 1956 the antiquarian Maurice Aveline, rue du Cirque, of whom he quickly became the right-hand man, then the partner. Very quickly, too, luck smiled on him. His first major business was a five-meter-long sideboard – a long low sideboard – from the cabinetmaker BVRB, bought for 260 pounds at a sale in London, and resold for 17 million dollars.

He prefers the eighteenth century to furniture that can be used anywhere.e “extraordinary and unreasonable” century, “the castle atmosphere, the invitation to party”

In the years 1970-1980, the furniture market of the XVIIIe at his best. His clients are John Paul Getty, Agnelli, Gunther Sachs and Hubert de Givenchy. If he stands out as a tenor of his profession, alongside Didier Aaron, Bernard Steinitz, Jacques Perrin and Maurice Ségoura, Jean-Marie Rossi does not fit the mold. He prefers the eighteenth century to furniture that can be used anywhere.e century “Extraordinary and unreasonable”, “The castle atmosphere, the invitation to the party”, he will say in the book Being an antique dealer (ed. Conflict !, 1983). When his colleagues were interested exclusively in statutory furniture, Riesener-stamped desks or Boulle cabinets, Jean-Marie Rossi pushed his curiosity towards English, Italian or German furniture as well as towards the 19th century.e century, then denigrated. “The Rossi taste was the originality of the shapes, summarizes the dealer Bill Pallot. He was interested in unusual objects, which anticipated their time. “

“A sacred panache”

Antique dealer by day, he spends his evenings in the company of artists, César, Arman and Etienne-Martin. In 1960, he even attended the famous performance during which Yves Klein, in a bow tie, orchestrated an anthropometry at the International Gallery of Contemporary Art. The daring antique dealer will be one of the very first French buyers of pop art. To his credit also works by Daniel Buren and Sol LeWitt. His best deal? A painting by Roy Lichtenstein, acquired for 6,000 francs at the Ileana Sonnabend gallery, the resale of which, years later, enabled him to purchase the walls of his 700 m2 gallery.2 place Beauvau.

You have 43.7% of this article to read. The rest is for subscribers only.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1638971299) } } ["channel"]=> array(7) { ["title"]=> string(22) "Culture – Movs.World" ["link"]=> string(18) "https://movs.world" ["lastbuilddate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 09 Dec 2021 11:00:39 +0000" ["language"]=> string(5) "en-US" ["sy"]=> array(2) { ["updateperiod"]=> string(9) " hourly " ["updatefrequency"]=> string(4) " 1 " } ["generator"]=> string(30) "https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.2" ["tagline"]=> NULL } ["textinput"]=> array(0) { } ["image"]=> array(5) { ["url"]=> string(76) "https://movs.world/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-fuzzyskunk-150x150.png" ["title"]=> string(22) "Culture – Movs.World" ["link"]=> string(18) "https://movs.world" ["width"]=> string(2) "32" ["height"]=> string(2) "32" } ["feed_type"]=> string(3) "RSS" ["feed_version"]=> string(3) "2.0" ["encoding"]=> string(5) "UTF-8" ["_source_encoding"]=> string(0) "" ["ERROR"]=> string(0) "" ["WARNING"]=> string(0) "" ["_CONTENT_CONSTRUCTS"]=> array(6) { [0]=> string(7) "content" [1]=> string(7) "summary" [2]=> string(4) "info" [3]=> string(5) "title" [4]=> string(7) "tagline" [5]=> string(9) "copyright" } ["_KNOWN_ENCODINGS"]=> array(3) { [0]=> string(5) "UTF-8" [1]=> string(8) "US-ASCII" [2]=> string(10) "ISO-8859-1" } ["stack"]=> array(0) { } ["inchannel"]=> bool(false) ["initem"]=> bool(false) ["incontent"]=> bool(false) ["intextinput"]=> bool(false) ["inimage"]=> bool(false) ["current_namespace"]=> bool(false) ["last_modified"]=> string(31) "Thu, 09 Dec 2021 11:07:30 GMT " ["etag"]=> string(29) "Rl44Mzcp790FMEb47XLoarWvLHM " }